emojustinyoung:

kievrob:

DEAR GOD, IT IS REAL

i am so offended yall thought i was lying

yesgamora:

My favorite thing about gotg was how Peter overcame his grief and turned into a goofball. We first saw him mourning over his loss and then abducted by an alien spacecraft. Imagine the terror and despair he had to go through…but next scene he’s dancing wild and enjoying the little things in life. And I think it sends a very meaningful message to the kids out there who have lost their parents. It tells them ”yes there are hard times and you’ll feel lost and lonely, but everything will turn out okay in the end.”

yesgamora:

My favorite thing about gotg was how Peter overcame his grief and turned into a goofball. We first saw him mourning over his loss and then abducted by an alien spacecraft. Imagine the terror and despair he had to go through…but next scene he’s dancing wild and enjoying the little things in life. And I think it sends a very meaningful message to the kids out there who have lost their parents. It tells them ”yes there are hard times and you’ll feel lost and lonely, but everything will turn out okay in the end.”

drawkill:

I’ve always liked the whole theory of Gengar being Clefables shadow.

drawkill:

I’ve always liked the whole theory of Gengar being Clefables shadow.

boy-on-the-moon-blog:

There was this guy at the amusement park dressed as sonic.

boy-on-the-moon-blog:

There was this guy at the amusement park dressed as sonic.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

baltigo:

One Piece Alphabet: S for Straw Hat

How I clean my room:

god-tiermeulin:

•start at one corner
•find something from 5 years ago and stare at it nostalgically for 10 hours
•go to bed